event-flag2019-05
Regional Outlook #5

The City and Talent

Time to Invest in Talent
For some time, campus has meant a specific geographic area with concentrated institutional estate and built environment. From concentrated to diffused institutional estates, here, we propose cities as a level of analyses to explore and understand the connections between learning, living and working.
As producers of urban knowledge and urbanizing actors in their own right, universities play a vital role in identifying the projects, processes, and agents involved in constructing the “region in itself”

— Jean Paul Addie

A city as Campus
City as campus invokes an idea that the urban environment is a living-learning classroom. In a city, living and learning can occur across the landscape rather than in defined areas, spaces and domains. In this regard, a city is the level of analysis from which relationships between students, institutions and their community may be explored and understood. Students and staff studying, researching, teaching, learning and living are doing so in and across cities. Rather than remaining locked in the highest room of the tallest ivory tower, students and staff are utilising and engaging in and with the whole of their surroundings. This experiential approach values the various ‘touch points’ and characteristics that define the makeup of a city’s DNA. The city as campus highlights how living and learning blur the lines between ‘us’ and ‘them’, institutions and cities, as well as traditional ideas of ‘where’, ‘when’, ‘how’ and with ‘what’ staff and students see their classroom, lab, study centre and from where they derive their living and learning from.

Learning
Institutions are a key driver of national and international demand for cities. Like the communities they reside in, institutions vary in their form, functions and stated purpose. Universities in particular act as magnets for talent. They are players in their environments, their facilities spread across their urban contexts. From medicine and social research to technology and the built environment, institutions are continuing to influence the supply, demand and distribution of learning across cities.

NUMBER OF INSTITUTIONS AND % OF STUDENTS / POPULATION
in 2018

Source: CBS

AMSTERDAM
0
INSTITUTIONS
student population 12.58%
ROTTERDAM
0
INSTITUTIONS
student population 14.24%
THE HAGUE
0
INSTITUTIONS
student population 5.58%

Living
Housing is a key building block of cities. The livability of a city and its ‘boundedness’ reflects the urban planning, organisation and built environment. As a consequence of increasing national and international demand for higher education, housing continues to be an acute concern for institutions and their city contexts looking to attract and retain talent. Specific types of housing, including student housing and co-living, private and public are in demand. Cities are seeing housing as a vital resource to attract, retain and support prospective and existing community members.

DWELLINGS STOCK BY CITYin 2018

 Source: CBS

Netherlands
Amsterdam
The Hague
Rotterdam
Stock Balance
 +73.921
 +8.775
 +2.570 
 +261
Initial stock vs Final stock

Working
Work environments in cities are evolving.
From rejuvenation of disused buildings to redevelopment and regeneration of entire city blocks, work spaces continue to be a key driver of redevelopment across cities. The form of these work spaces reflect trends in work preferences. From traditional office buildings to co-working and shared work studio spaces, new types of working are inspiring new spaces that respond to digital nomads and traditionalists alike.

JOBS BY SECTOR AND CITY

 Source: CBS

AMSTERDAM
Business support services 14%
Human health and social work activities 13%
Wholesale and retail trade 12.4%
ROTTERDAM
Business support services 14.3%
Human health and social work activities 16.3%
Wholesale and retail trade 12.4%
THE HAGUE
Business support services 14.3%
Human health and social work activities 14.5%
Public Sector 23.5%

Public & Social spaces
Public and social spaces underpin Learning, Living and Working in cities. The public and social spaces activate the social life of cities and connect these ‘layers’ of the city as campus. From open public spaces to private garden retreats that dot many cities, the social life of a city is key to the ‘liveability’ of city life. Connecting with others means finding those spaces and places where you can connect, and, when needed retreat and reflect. From pubs to clubs, museums to coffee houses, blurring the lines between home and work is becoming ever more important to the design and development of the city campus.

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